Move, Play, and Learn - Two Activities

Head, Shoulders, Knees & Toes

Age
Birth+
Materials
None
Setting
A bed, couch, or simply on the floor with a blanket placed under the child. Fun to play during daily routines, such as diapering, dressing, or bathing.
Description
While playing, dressing, and changing diapers, identify body parts as you touch them on your infant. You can wiggle them, kiss them, slowly move them, etc., while saying, "This is your ———." The activity can also be done in a supportive seated position in front of a mirror.

Learning Outcomes

Social Emotional
Child explores gross (large) motor movement and begins to gain control of arm and leg movements.
Language and Literacy
Infants express themselves using verbal and nonverbal cues, such as crying, laughing, turning their heads away, and/or reaching for a familiar adult. If the infant is laughing or cooing, respond to this cue by continuing the activity. If s/he begins to cry or turn the head away, s/he may be over-stimulated and need a break from the activity.
Gross Motor
Child responds to familiar adults' interactions and engages in social games with familiar adults through playful back-and-forth interactions.
Did You Know?
Child begins to listen to words with understanding and begins to understand labeling body parts as part of inter actions with adults.
Movement Milestone
At 1 month infants usually can raise their heads and lift their chins up from the floor or bed.

 

Roll it Along

Age
12 months and up
Materials
Ball
Setting
A carpeted or cushioned surface
Description
Sit across from the toddler, approximately 3 - 4 feet, with legs spread apart and say, "Here comes the ball." The child will trap the ball with his or her arms and chest. Encourage the child to roll the ball back to you.

Learning Outcomes

Social Emotional
Toddler is responsive in interactions with others and begins to build relationships. Toddler engages in social games, including playful give and take.
Large Motor Skills
Toddler continues to develop gross (large) motor skills and builds skills in coordination, balance, and body awareness. Toddler gains control of arm movements.
Did You Know?
Toddlers learn the best through activity, especially activ-ity that is based on their interests and experiences. Tod-dlers are also highly motivated by their caregiver's enthusi-astic participation, positive feedback, and modeling. Head Start Body Start recommends that caregivers use effective cues to support toddlers' participation and development. Caregivers should consistently attend to toddlers' com­munication, including both verbal and nonverbal signs. Caregivers should be sensitive to the emotions they con­vey, even subtly in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus building a trusting, nurturing relationship. Caregivers should frequently provide encouragement, including facial, verbal, and or nonverbal expressions, to motivate toddlers' physical participation. Caregivers may provide physical guidance and support as frequently as needed.

 

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